Animal Health Center Feed https://www.drovers.com/ en FDA Works to Address Opioid Supply Shortage https://www.drovers.com/article/fda-works-address-opioid-supply-shortage <p class="MsoNoSpacing">In its continuing mission to protect animal health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that it has worked with Pfizer Inc. to help alleviate a shortage of certain injectable opioids available to treat pain in animals, by facilitating the availability of a limited amount of product labeled for human use. Most of the opioid pain medications used in veterinary medicine are approved for use in humans but also used in animals. This is called <a href="https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/ucm380135.htm">extra-label use</a>.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">In September 2018, the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) became aware that veterinarians that had relied on these products for pain control in their patients were no longer able to obtain them through their standard distribution channels, due to a recent shortage of injectable opioids and to Pfizer’s decision to restrict distribution of such products for human use only during the ongoing shortage.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">CVM met with Pfizer to raise awareness about the veterinary community’s need for injectable opioids and discuss how a limited supply of product imported from other countries could be made available for use in the U.S. veterinary market. The FDA had already given Pfizer <a href="https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/DrugShortages/UCM617292.pdf">permission to import</a> Hydromorphone Hydrochloride Injection, USP, in 2 mg/ml strength, 1 ml volume ampules to help alleviate the ongoing opioid shortage in human medicine. As a result of CVM’s recent discussion with Pfizer, this product is now available in limited quantities for pain management in animals.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">In addition to hydromorphone, Pfizer also has made Morphine Sulfate Injection, USP in vials and ampules available to the U.S. veterinary market. These products are currently in short supply but will continue to be available to veterinary practitioners when supply increases.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Injectable opioids are used in animals to treat pain following severe trauma and to control pain during and after surgery. Adequate pain control is essential in animals, as in humans. By making these products available for veterinary use, Pfizer is helping to ensure that veterinarians have a more complete formulary of products to manage pain in their animal patients, to assist in their recovery and to minimize suffering.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Veterinarians can purchase the products through their normal distribution chains, which have been alerted that they are now available in limited supply for the veterinary market. Pfizer reports that it expects the opioid shortage to end in early 2019, and it will continue to keep these products available to the veterinary market in the interim.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Additional Information</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/ProductSafetyInformation/ucm628289.htm">Letter to Veterinarians - Temporary Importation of Hydromorphone Hydrochloride Injection, USP 2 mg/ml ampules from Canada to Address U.S. Opioid Drug Shortage</a></p> Syringe-Drovers Syringe info@farmjournal.com (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) Fri, 14 Dec 2018 09:54:39 CST Animal Health Center Feed Coalition Applauds Farm Bill Animal Health Provisions ​ https://www.drovers.com/article/coalition-applauds-farm-bill-animal-health-provisions <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Members of the Animal Agriculture Coalition released a statement applauding animal health provisions included in the 2018 Farm Bill Conference Report, which was sent to President Trump’s desk for signature earlier today:</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">“America’s livestock and poultry producers, in concert with veterinarians, work hard to ensure the health of the animals they raise. They play a central role in not only providing nutritious food for families across the U.S., but also in creating jobs and contributing to our country’s economic stability. That’s why producers and veterinarians agree that one of our greatest priorities must be to lessen the impact of devastating animal diseases with a one-of-a-kind program that will strengthen our ability to rapidly identify and respond to them.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">“We are pleased that the 2018 Farm Bill Conference Report recognizes this need and provides mandatory funding for research into animal health and diseases as well as measures to help the animal agriculture industry act quickly when concerns are identified. This investment in animal health is a good start and will help ensure that the industry is better prepared now and into the future – simply put, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">“We thank Chairman Conaway, Chairman Roberts, Ranking Member Peterson and Ranking Member Stabenow, as well as their teams, for their dedicated efforts to deliver the Conference Report. Providing greater certainty to the animal agriculture industry by putting a functioning plan in place to address potential issues is critically important. We applaud Congress for moving quickly to pass the Farm Bill Conference Report and send it to President Trump to be signed into law before the end of the year.”</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Signed by the following animal agriculture groups:</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Alabama Poultry &amp; Egg Association<br /> American Association of Avian Pathologists<br /> American Association of Bovine Practitioners<br /> American Association of Mycobacterial Diseases<br /> American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians<br /> American Dairy Goat Association<br /> American Dairy Science Association<br /> American Feed Industry Association<br /> American Goat Federation<br /> American Horse Council<br /> American Rabbit Breeders Association, Inc.<br /> American Sheep Industry Association<br /> American Society of Animal Science<br /> American Veterinary Medical Association<br /> Animal Agriculture Alliance<br /> Animal Health Institute<br /> Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges<br /> Association of Veterinary Biologics Companies<br /> Biotechnology Innovation Organization<br /> California Poultry Federation<br /> Catfish Farmers of America<br /> Chicken &amp; Egg Association of Minnesota<br /> Colorado Egg Producers<br /> FASS, Inc.<br /> Florida Poultry Federation<br /> Global Cold Chain Alliance<br /> Indiana Dairy Producers<br /> Indiana State Poultry Association<br /> International Association of Refrigerated Warehouses<br /> Iowa Poultry Association<br /> Iowa Turkey Federation<br /> Kansas Livestock Association<br /> Kentucky Poultry Federation<br /> Livestock Marketing Association<br /> Michigan Allied Poultry Industries<br /> Minnesota Turkey Growers Association<br /> Mississippi Poultry Association<br /> Mycobacterial Disease of Animals Multistate Initiative<br /> National Assembly of State Animal Health Officials<br /> National Association for the Advancement of Animal Science<br /> National Association of Federal Veterinarians<br /> National Association of State Departments of Agriculture<br /> National Dairy Herd Information Association<br /> National Grain and Feed Association<br /> National Milk Producer’s Federation<br /> National Pork Producers Council<br /> National Renderer’s Association<br /> National Turkey Federation<br /> New Mexico Wool Growers<br /> North American Meat Institute<br /> North Carolina Poultry Federation<br /> Ohio Poultry Association<br /> PennAg Industries Association<br /> South Carolina Poultry Federation<br /> South Dakota Poultry Industries Association<br /> Texas Poultry Federation<br /> The Poultry Federation: Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas<br /> U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center Stakeholder Committee<br /> U.S. Poultry and Egg Association<br /> United Egg Association – Further Processors Division<br /> United Egg Producers<br /> United States Animal Health Association<br /> Virginia Poultry Federation<br /> Wisconsin Poultry &amp; Egg Industries Association</span></span></span></p> Calves and AVC-Spring-15 011 (500x333) Cow and Calf info@farmjournal.com (AVMA) Thu, 13 Dec 2018 09:15:02 CST Animal Health Center Feed Time to Begin the Early Evening Feeding of the Spring-Calving Cows https://www.drovers.com/article/time-begin-early-evening-feeding-spring-calving-cows <p>Each year in December, it is time for a reminder to change the feeding schedule for part, if not all of the spring-calving cow herd.</p> <p>It is generally accepted that adequate supervision at calving has a significant impact on reducing calf mortality. Adequate supervision has been of increasing importance with the higher price of live calves at sale time. On most ranching operations, supervision of the first calf heifers will be best accomplished in daylight hours and the poorest observation takes place in the middle of the night.</p> <p>The easiest and most practical method of inhibiting nighttime calving at present is by feeding cows at night; the physiological mechanism is unknown, but some hormonal effect may be involved. Rumen motility studies indicate the frequency of rumen contractions falls a few hours before parturition. Intraruminal pressure begins to fall in the last 2 weeks of gestation, with a more rapid decline during calving. It has been suggested that night feeding causes intraruminal pressures to rise at night and decline in the daytime.</p> <p>The concept is called the Konefal method. A Canadian rancher, Gus Konefal reported his observations in the 1970’s. In a follow-up Canadian study of 104 Hereford cows, 38.4% of a group fed at 8:00 am and again at 3:00 pm delivered calves during the day, whereas 79.6% of a group fed at 11:00 am and 9:00 pm actually calved during daylight hours. In a more convincing study, 1331 cows on 15 farms in Iowa were fed once daily at dusk, 85% of the calves were born between 6:00 am and 6:00 pm.</p> <p>Kansas State University scientists recorded data on 5 consecutive years in a herd of spring calving crossbred cows at the Kansas State University Agricultural Research Center at Hays, Kansas. They recorded the time of calving (to within the nearest one-half hour). Births that could not be estimated within an hour of occurrence were excluded. Cows were fed forage sorghum hay daily between 4:00 and 6:00 pm. For statistical purposes, the day was divided into four-hour periods.</p> <table><tbody><tr><td> <p>Between 6:00 and 10:00 am, 34.23% of the calves were born;</p> </td> </tr><tr><td> <p>Between 10:00 am and 2:00 pm, 21.23% of the calves were born;</p> </td> </tr><tr><td> <p>Between 2:00 and 6:00 pm 29.83% of the calves were born;</p> </td> </tr><tr><td> <p>Between 6:00 and 10:00 pm, 8.41% of the calves were born</p> </td> </tr><tr><td> <p>Between 10:00 pm and 2:00 am, 4.4% of the calves were born</p> </td> </tr><tr><td> <p>Between 2:00 am and 6 am, 1.91% of the calves were born</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p>It is interesting to note that 85.28% of the calves were born between 6:00 am. and 6:00 pm. This is very similar to Iowa data when cows were fed at dusk. , Feeding the forage in the early evening hours undoubtedly influenced the percentage of cows calving in daylight hours. (Jaeger and co-workers. Abstracts 2002 Western Section of American Society of Animal Science.)</p> <p>At Oklahoma State University, with cows that had round-the-clock access to big round bales, but the supplement was fed at dusk, 70% of the calves came in daylight hours. Some producers choose to put the big bales of hay inside a fenced pasture or lot. The gate to the hay area is opened in the evening to allow cows access to the hay bale(s), then the cows are herded out of haying area to another pasture the following morning to graze throughout the day.</p> <p>Although, the Konefal method does not let us completely skip the middle of the night heifer checks, this strategy should help us save more calves that need help at delivery and shortly thereafter.</p> BT%20Winter%20Feeding%20Cows.JPG info@farmjournal.com (Glenn Selk Wed, 12 Dec 2018 11:58:00 CST Animal Health Center Feed Corn, Silage Samples Show Uptick in Mold Levels https://www.drovers.com/article/corn-silage-samples-show-uptick-mold-levels <p>Wet growing and harvest conditions this past growing season have resulted in an uptick in the number of corn grain and silage samples that are coming up positive for mold, yeast, zearalenone and vomitoxin, reports Dairyland Labs, based in Arcadia, Wis.</p> <p>If you suspect contamination of your feeds, it’s best to have them tested to determine if feed is contaminated and at what levels. Following is a list of feed sampling tips from Dairyland:</p> <ul><li>Whether sampling from a bin, truck or bunk it is important to obtain a representative sample.</li> <li>The best method is to collect subsamples from areas of the bunk, silo, truck, bin, etc. and mix them. Then pull a composite to be sent to the lab.</li> <li>Avoid sampling at the beginning or end of a load when sampling moving products.</li> <li>If health issues due to mold or mycotoxins are suspected it is best to obtain a representative sample that is as close as possible to what the animal consumed.</li> <li>Store samples in a cool, dry location - in bags where oxygen has been eliminated as much as possible. In the case of samples being used for mold and yeast analysis, do not freeze samples as this has the potential to cause inaccurate results. Samples for mycotoxin analysis can be frozen with no impact on sample results.</li> <li>Realize that any added time in storage or shipping has the potential to promote additional mold &amp; yeast growth, especially in samples greater than 13-15% moisture.</li> <li>When interpreting results, it is important to take into consideration the storage structure being used as well as how well the composite sample represented the product.</li> <li>If possible, try to send samples to the lab at the beginning of the week, to decrease any delayed shipping time.</li> </ul><p>For more information on dealing with molds and mycotoxins, <a href="https://www.dairylandlabs.com/molds-and-mycotoxins">click here</a>.</p> <div> </div> Pull-back-pucture.jpg info@farmjournal.com (Jim Dickrell) Wed, 12 Dec 2018 03:21:49 CST Animal Health Center Feed Proper Forage Sampling Procedures https://www.drovers.com/article/proper-forage-sampling-procedures <p>Hay bales can be an effective and reliable feed source for livestock as the weather turns cold and dreary. When it comes to feeding or selling hay through the winter, one thing that should never be neglected is to get the hay properly tested. The information gained from forage sampling will help to better determine the hay’s market value and ration formulation for livestock.</p> <p>Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service recommends the following forage sampling procedures:</p> <ul><li>Sample by forage lot. A forage lot is hay or silage taken from the same location, field, or farm, the same cutting (within a 48-hour period) at the same plant maturity, with similar amounts of grass, weeds, rain damage, or preservative treatment. Every field and cutting is different, so do not combine hays of different qualities or cuttings into one composite sample.</li> <li>Sample at the optimum time. Collect hay or silage samples as close to the time of feeding or sale as possible. Sampling immediately before feeding accounts for any heating or weathering losses that may have occurred during storage.</li> <li>Select a sharp, well-designed coring device. It is important to get a representative sample of forages to be tested. This is most effectively achieved by using a probe that is 12 to 24 inches in length and has an inside diameter of 3/8 to 1 inch. A greater number of small samples are more representative than fewer large samples. To sample bales and stacks of hay, take at least 20 cores that are 12 to 15 inches deep.</li> <li>Keep good records. Record name, date the crop was harvested, date sampled, and an identifier code or number for the lot on the bag with a permanent marker. The information will be useful when test results are received to help identify lots for correct feeding or marketing.</li> <li>Ship samples immediately. Ship or deliver samples to the laboratory as soon as possible to prevent moisture loss and microbial deterioration of the sample. It is best to deliver samples early in the week to be sure the samples don’t sit in the lab over the weekend or through holidays.</li> </ul><p>Sampling hay and forages can be very beneficial for both feeding the correct nutrient values and optimizing marketing strategies, but it is important to remember, forage analysis results are only as good as the sample provided to the laboratory.</p> Haytest11413.jpg info@farmjournal.com (Jeri Geren Tue, 11 Dec 2018 06:54:00 CST Animal Health Center Feed FDA Calls for New Labeling to Protect Effectiveness of Dewormers https://www.drovers.com/article/fda-calls-new-labeling-protect-effectiveness-dewormers <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced this week that it has requested that animal drug companies voluntarily revise the labels of drugs intended to treat certain internal parasites in livestock and horses to add information about antiparasitic resistance. This move comes as a result of the agency’s work with veterinary parasitology experts and the animal health community to find ways to maintain the effectiveness of these drugs. The requested labeling changes are for approved antiparasitic animal drug products only, and do not relate to antimicrobial drug products or antimicrobial resistance.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The requested labeling changes specifically affect anthelmintics for livestock (cattle, sheep, goats, poultry, and swine) and horses. Anthelmintics, often called dewormers, are animal drugs that treat helminths. Helminth refers to several groups of internal parasites, often called worms, that have some similarities. Tapeworms and roundworms are common types of helminths. Helminths are becoming increasingly resistant to drugs that were generally effective against them in the past. In these situations, after an animal is treated with a dewormer, the susceptible worms die and the resistant worms survive to pass on resistance genes to their offspring.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Although antiparasitic resistance in livestock and horses does not directly affect human health in the U.S., it is a growing animal health threat in this country. Heavy worm infections can cause diarrhea, weight loss, anemia (decreased level of red blood cells), and death. Antiparasitic resistance is particularly concerning in grazing species (cattle, sheep, goats, and horses), but is also a problem in swine and poultry.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The new labeling information emphasizes these important points:</p> <ul><li class="MsoNoSpacing">Any use of a dewormer can result in the development of antiparasitic resistance.</li> <li class="MsoNoSpacing">Proper dosing is critical to the safe and effective use of a dewormer.</li> <li class="MsoNoSpacing">End-users should work with their veterinarian to monitor herds and flocks to determine the extent of antiparasitic resistance on a particular farm.</li> <li class="MsoNoSpacing">Dewormers should be used as only one part of an overall internal parasite control program.</li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing">The FDA also reminds veterinarians, livestock producers, and animal owners about antiparasitic resistance and the importance of developing an overall parasite control program to slow resistance to dewormers. Veterinarians, livestock producers, and animal owners may not be aware of the threat of antiparasitic resistance or ways to slow it down. The new labeling information will help them better understand the proper use of dewormers and ways to monitor and slow down the development of antiparasitic resistance at the farm level.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The new labeling information does not replace the need to work with a veterinarian to determine appropriate parasite management strategies for individual animals or herds or flocks. Rather, the new language focuses on how to properly incorporate dewormers into an overall parasite control program and how to slow down the development of antiparasitic resistance. Slowing the development of resistance extends the effectiveness of dewormers and better protects animal health in the long term.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">Because grazing animals are continually exposed to worm eggs on the pasture, they can have repeated parasite infections. Although most swine and poultry in the U.S. are not raised on pasture, the number of these animals being pasture-raised is growing. This increases their chances of being repeatedly exposed to worms which may then become resistant to dewormers. The FDA is aware that management practices and production schemes for swine and poultry differ from those in grazing species, and the new labeling information will reflect these differences.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The FDA is requesting that drug companies add information about antiparasitic resistance to both over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription dewormers. Some approved dewormers for livestock and horses are prescription only, but most are OTC. For a product to be approved as OTC, the label must have adequate directions for use that are written in such a way that a non-veterinarian can use the drug safely and effectively. Including information about resistance on the label of OTC dewormers is important for communicating adequate directions for use to non-veterinarians. More detailed information about the proper use of OTC dewormers and ways to monitor resistance will help livestock producers and animal owners use these products safely and effectively.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The FDA is requesting that drug companies include this information on the labels of their currently marketed FDA-approved dewormers for livestock and horses within the next 12 months, and on labels for any new dewormer that FDA approves for use in these animals.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/parasite-control-kill-most-protect-some">Parasite Control: Kill most, protect some</a></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/manage-against-drug-resistance">Manage against drug resistance</a></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/refine-your-deworming-program">Refine Your Deworming Program</a></p> Deworming Deworming info@farmjournal.com (FDA) Thu, 06 Dec 2018 02:56:27 CST Animal Health Center Feed Watch for Rabies in Cattle https://www.drovers.com/article/watch-rabies-cattle <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span style="background:white"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#222222">While we think of wild animals as the primary carriers of rabies, domestic livestock including cattle are susceptible to the virus, and because of their more frequent contact with humans, can pose a risk of transmission.</span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:1.5rem; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:1rem"><span style="background:white"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="text-rendering:optimizelegibility"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="orphans:2"><span style="widows:2"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#222222">It’s always wise to put rabies on a differential list for cattle. Below are the clinical signs of rabies in cattle that veterinarians and producers need to keep in mind. Make sure to stress to producers that if they suspect rabies in an animal, to call a veterinarian immediately and not wait to “see how it comes out.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:1.5rem; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:1rem"><span style="background:white"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="text-rendering:optimizelegibility"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="orphans:2"><span style="widows:2"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><b><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#222222">Clinical signs of rabies in cattle</span></span></b><br style="box-sizing:inherit" /><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#222222">Cattle with “furious” rabies can be dangerous, attacking and pursuing humans and other animals. Cattle with “dumb” or paralytic rabies have minimal behavior changes, but progress into paralysis.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:1.5rem; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:1rem"><span style="background:white"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="text-rendering:optimizelegibility"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="orphans:2"><span style="widows:2"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#222222">Clinical signs of rabies can be varied in cattle and other animals. Some of the more common clinical signs include:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Sudden change in behavior</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Progressive paralysis</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Ataxia</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Abrupt cessation of lactation in dairy animals</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Hypersensitivity/alertness</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Abnormal bellowing</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Paralysis of the throat</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Drooling</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Head extension</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Bloat</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="font-size:inherit"><span style="background:white"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Open Sans&quot;,serif">Choking behavior</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing" style="margin:1.5rem; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:1rem"><span style="box-sizing:inherit"><span style="text-rendering:optimizelegibility"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="orphans:2"><span style="widows:2"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial"><span style="word-spacing:0px">Read more about cattle rabies in these articles on BovineVetOnline:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/usda-field-trials-indicate-oral-rabies-vaccine-safehttps:/www.bovinevetonline.com/article/usda-field-trials-indicate-oral-rabies-vaccine-safe">USDA Field Trials Indicate Oral Rabies Vaccine Safe</a></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/new-pcr-rabies-test-could-improve-treatment-decisions">New PCR Rabies Test Could Improve Treatment Decisions</a></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="hhttps://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/rabies-detection-potentially-saves-lives">Rabies Detection Potentially Saves Lives</a></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"> </p> Rabies-Vaccine-bait-USDA Rabies Vaccine Bait info@farmjournal.com (Bovine Veterinarian News Source) Thu, 06 Dec 2018 12:01:48 CST Animal Health Center Feed USDA Plans Wildlife Fencing in Fight Against Fever Ticks https://www.drovers.com/article/usda-plans-wildlife-fencing-fight-against-fever-ticks <p class="MsoNoSpacing">USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is publishing a record of decision for the final environmental impact statement (EIS) on cattle fever tick fencing in South Texas.On May 31, 2018, USDA published the final environmental impact statement that discussed how to continue to protect U.S. livestock from cattle fever ticks and the disease they cause, bovine babesiosis, which is severe and often fatal. The EIS found that the installation of wildlife fencing in strategic areas along the quarantine zone will create a minimally intrusive pest control measure that augments existing programs.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">APHIS is now publishing the final record of decision and will begin working with property owners to install 8-foot-tall game fencing along strategic portions of the permanent tick quarantine line in Zapata County, Texas.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">APHIS is taking these actions to protect the livestock industry and overall cattle health. The fences will help prevent potentially affected deer from travelling into unaffected areas. The fencing is designed to restrict movement of wildlife. The fencing will initially cover two miles, but if needed and funding is available, it could be expanded to cover up to 50 miles in Maverick, Starr, and Webb counties. The fencing will be paid for by APHIS, and the Texas Animal Health Commission will be responsible for ongoing maintenance.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing">The record of decision may be viewed <a href="https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=APHIS-2010-0100">here</a>.</p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong>Read more about cattle feeder ticks in these articles on BovineVetOnline:</strong></p> <ul><li class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/fever-tick-proposal-includes-grazing-wildlife-refuges">Fever Tick Proposal Includes Grazing Wildlife Refuges</a></li> <li class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/environmental-assessment-favorable-fever-tick-eradication">Environmental Assessment Favorable for Fever tick Eradication</a></li> <li class="MsoNoSpacing"><a href="https://www.bovinevetonline.com/article/temporary-resolution-reached-texas-cattle-fever-tick-spray-boxes">Temporary Resolution Reached in Texas on Cattle Fever Tick Spray Boxes</a></li> </ul> Fever ticks-USDA Cattle Fever Ticks info@farmjournal.com (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Thu, 06 Dec 2018 04:17:02 CST Animal Health Center Feed One Health Series: The Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance https://www.drovers.com/article/one-health-series-politics-antimicrobial-resistance <p>In 2001, Dr. Laura Kahn was a student at Princeton University, pursuing a master’s degree in public policy. Then, Sept. 11 changed her career.<br />  <br /> Kahn embarked on a study that looked at how the government responded to biological threats. Her work revealed a communications void.<br />  <br /> “The gist of my findings was that physicians and veterinarians rarely, if ever, talk to each other and that departments of health and agriculture rarely, if ever, talk to each other. Yet, the vast majority of these diseases, these microbes, whether they are emerging diseases or agents of bioterrorism, they are zoonotic, affecting animals and people,” she says.<br />  <br /> Kahn was intrigued. How could such silos exist when public health was at stake? A Texas veterinarian later suggested she look at the same communications gap regarding antimicrobial resistance —  and why so much blame in medical literature pointed toward agriculture.<br />  <br /> “That was interesting to me. That was a subject that I had not been aware of nor had been paying much attention to. I decided to delve into it and after five years of pouring over government data — both here and in Europe and around the world — that was what prompted me to write the book, <em>One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance</em>,” Kahn says. “The results were quite surprising. They were not what I was expecting.”<br />  <br /> A physician and research scholar, Kahn did painstaking research that included all facets of antibiotic resistance, from human, animal and environmental relationships to international policies. She found complex factors contributing to resistance. But attempts to reduce antibiotics use had been relatively narrow in scope, with human and animal medicine operating independently.<br />  <br /> “I think people need to realize that, yes, antibiotics are the foundation of modern medicine. Without safe and effective antibiotics, the practice of modern medicine basically collapses. At the same time, whereas antibiotics are the foundation of medicine, agriculture and the food security it provides is the foundation of civilization itself.”<br />  <br /> The struggle is finding balance between food security and effective medicine.<br />  <br /> “Here in the US, we’ve been very fortunate that we have a plethora of meat. We spend less here in this country than any other country on the planet. According to USDA data, we spend less than 10% of our income on food. But there are those in public health that want to eliminate that option of meat being raised conventionally. So then the question is, ‘What are the poor going to eat?’ ” Kahn explains. “This is a very political issue – food security, particularly, food security of animal proteins.”<br />  <br /> In Sweden, for example, stringent regulations of antibiotics use in livestock contributed to rising domestic meat prices compared to cheaper imported meat, Kahn writes.<br /><br /> In Europe, whole genome sequencing suggests that a bacteria known as vancomycin-resistant <em>Enterococcus faecium</em> (VRE) in human patients might have come from pet dogs rather than livestock, as initially suggested.<br />  <br /> Kahn says this example illustrates that we must collaborate and use better tools — like whole genome sequencing — if we are to fully understand the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria.<br />  <br /> “We need to develop rapid diagnostics, antibiotic alternatives, particularly phage therapy. We need state-of-the-art sanitation systems around the world, particularly when you’ve got megacities of millions of people living together,” she notes. “So there’s a lot of things that we can do, including the surveillance of pets and understanding our pet’s microbiomes.”<br />  <br /> Kahn says most veterinarians are embracing a One Health approach to addressing antimicrobial resistance, while interest from the medical community lags. That’s slowly starting to change, she says.<br />  <br /> “Antimicrobial resistance is a very complicated issue. Pointing fingers at agriculture or at medicine as the culprits is not helpful,” she says. “Everybody wants to be part of the solution, and we all need to work together, looking at humans, animals and the environment if we want to adequately address antimicrobial resistance.”<br /><br /> Learn more about antibiotic stewardship or the National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) at animalagriculture.org. You can also find a link to Dr. Kahn’s book on Amazon. </p> One Health — The Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance Hospital Antibiotics.jpg info@farmjournal.com (National Institute for Animal Agriculture) Wed, 05 Dec 2018 12:37:36 CST Animal Health Center Feed Hay Outlook: Milk and Grain Prices Could Impact Hay Demand in 2019 https://www.drovers.com/article/hay-outlook-milk-and-grain-prices-could-impact-hay-demand-2019 <p>Hay markets can be difficult to project heading into any year, and 2019 might have some of the most complex dynamics to consider for hay pricing and demand. Weather will always play a role in regional markets, while competitive demand from dairy and beef cattle herds also play a role. Comparative pricing of other feedstuffs need to be considered and with lower commodity pricing there might be advantages to feeding more grain in livestock diets.</p> <p>Taking a look back at 2018 hay prices rose around much of the country. According <a href="http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/AgriPric/AgriPric-11-29-2018.pdf">USDA’s latest Agriculture Prices Report released in November</a>, “All Hay” prices for during October 2018 averaged $162/ton, up $21/ton from the previous time last year. Alfalfa saw an even wider swing in prices with $178/ton being the average nationwide in 2018, while the October price last year was sharply lower at $153/ton. The “Other Hay” price sits at $132/ton for this year, a $10/ton increase from last year.</p> <h3>Looking Back and Forward</h3> <p>Alfalfa hay acreage has been on a decline for the past few decades. Carl Zulauf, economist with Ohio State University, has been analyzing hay production trends for several years and he <a href="https://www.dairyherd.com/article/look-back-us-hay-market-over-last-100-years">shared this trend in a recent study of hay production for the last 100 years</a>.</p> <p>For instance, the report shows alfalfa acres have fallen by 37% since 1979, while non-alfalfa acres have increased 12%. That resulted in alfalfa’s share of hay acres declining from 45% to 31%.</p> <p>Despite that fall off for alfalfa, Zulauf notes that during the 1980s farming crisis there was a slight uptick in total hay acreage, largely because hay was more profitable to produce. “We increased total acres by 3.5 million between 1980 and 1986. That is a very stark contrast to what is going on this time,” Zulauf says.</p> <p>During the latest downturn in agriculture looking at a near market top in 2013 for most commodities to the current lows, there has been a drop in hay acres of 2.8 million acres according to USDA data.</p> <p>“This very different response than in the 1980s, when we also had a large decline in grain prices, is worth pointing out and considering from a hay market and crop production perspective,” Zulauf says.</p> <p>It isn’t immediately clear what all has led to the downturn in hay acreage, but price ratios probably are part of the explanation.  Zulauf says the price ratio of hay to corn went up 75% from 1980 to 1986, showing a clear incentive to expand. However, since 2013 the ratio has only increased 10%.</p> <p>“I don't have a feeling for what is causing the different change in the price ratios, but it is not likely something being caused by temporary factors since changes over several years in both periods are being compared,” Zulauf says.</p> <p>Those types of temporary factors would primarily be drought or high priced commodity markets.</p> <h3>Milk Market Impact</h3> <p>Dairy cattle account for a large part of hay demand with quality alfalfa fed in lactating cow diets, and grass hay being fed to non-lactating cattle.</p> <p>In areas of the country where there are large pockets of dairies, hay grown locally plays a crucial role. Unfortunately with another year of low milk prices there have been a number of small and mid-size farms leaving the dairy business. This leaves potential challenges for hay growers who sell regionally.</p> <p>Northeastern states like New York have seen dairies stop milking cows and this could be a big influence on regional hay markets, says Joe Lawrence, dairy forage specialist for Cornell University.</p> <p>“There are still a lot of small dairy farms that are talking about exiting the business in the next six to 12 months. Traditionally those smaller dairies, as they have sold the cows, a lot of them have gone into selling hay,” Lawrence says.</p> <p>Should those farmers who sell their cows and keep their land continue to put up hay, there could potentially be a localized surplus of hay on the market. “Given that commodity prices aren’t great, they won’t be encouraged to go into corn or soybeans,” Lawrence adds, so hay could be the best option.</p> <p>This potential problem of hay oversupplies might not just be unique to the Northeast. It could impact other areas like Wisconsin where a large number of dairies have been shuttered recently.</p> Hay_Outlook 2019.jpg info@farmjournal.com (Wyatt Bechtel) Wed, 05 Dec 2018 03:04:02 CST Animal Health Center Feed